Mulberry Private Healthcare
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Appointments/Reservations – Tel: 01480 418761
Financial Queries – Tel: 01480 418761/418751

  • Wound infections can occur in any form of intestinal surgery, open or laparoscopic. Wound infections rarely cause serious problems but may require treatment with antibiotics.
  • Occasionally the join that the surgeon makes in the bowel can leak. This is known as an anastomotic leak. If a leak occurs sometimes this can be managed with antibiotics and/ or a drain placed through the abdominal wall usually in the x-ray department. If the leak is larger and peritonitis develops another operation will be necessary and the surgeon will need to create a stoma (ileostomy) or even take apart the join completely and create a colostomy.
  • Sometimes the bowel may take longer than normal to start working, this is known as ileus. Patients may develop abdominal distension and vomiting. If this happens the surgeon will normally recommend a period of bowel rest with continued intravenous fluids and sometimes a tube passed via the nose to the stomach (nasogastric tube).  When the bowel doesn’t start working properly, there may be a kink, twist or an adhesion causing a blockage. This is known as obstruction.
  • Patients may develop colicky abdominal pains, abdominal distension and vomiting. If this happens the surgeon will normally recommend a period of bowel rest with continued intravenous fluids and sometimes a tube passed via the nose to the stomach (nasogastric tube). In most cases the obstruction settles spontaneously occasionally an operation is required to relieve the blockage.
  • There are important nerves in the pelvis and whilst the surgeon will make every effort to avoid damaging these it is recognised that they can sometimes be involved in this type of surgery. These nerves are important as they control erections and ejaculation in men and influence bladder emptying in men and women. The effects may improve with time but sometimes these can be permanent. Patients who have had radiotherapy (link) are at higher risk of pelvic nerve dysfunction after surgery.
  • Sometimes during the operation the surgeon discovers that it is not possible to carry out the procedure using a wholly keyhole approach. In this situation a cut is made and the operation is done as an open procedure. This is known as conversion

Patient Satisfaction

Our patient satisfaction is monitored via Patient Satisfaction Questionnaires which patients are asked to complete before they leave the Mulberry Ward. Our most recent results show that 99%of our patients would recommend us to their family and friends

Contact Us

Mulberry Private Healthcare
Hinchingbrooke Hospital, Hinchingbrooke Park
Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire
PE29 6NT

Appointments/Reservations – Tel: 01480 418761
Financial Queries – Tel: 01480 418761/418751
email: mulberry.privatehealthcare@nhs.net